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Nautical antiques/1V-Octant
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Code 1V
EUR 1800.00
In stock

EUR 1800.00
In stock

used

2372014135956734Code 1V OctantVintage octant, ebony and ivory, signed King & Son Bristol, British manufacture of the first half of the XIX century, from 0° to 95° with circular sight with two holes. Measures cm 35.5x29.5x8 - inches 13.97x11.61x3.14. Very good condition.

The octant, the eighth part of circle, is a reflection instrument, conceived about in 1731 by John Hadley (1682-1744) and used for measure on the sea the height of the Sun or of a star in comparison with horizon. A mobile arm with a mirror and fixed on a graduated arc makes possible to obtain by reflection the image of the star laid upon the image of horizon directly observed. First instruments was made using valuable wood, ebony or mahogany, and they had ivory gradation; then they were replaced by brass or bronze instruments, and the gradations were engraved on a silver strip, fixed in the metallic arch of border.

John King established an optical and scientific instruments business in Bristol in 1821, taking over the business of his former employers, Charles and Richard Beilby, who had a scientific instrument business at 2 Clare Street. He had some problem with his son, whose name was also John, who abandoned his wife and children for another woman in 1831: their instruments were signed both John King and King and Son. Thomas Davies King was a son of John King jr and also an istruments maker as his father and grandfather; he briefly formed a partnership with Henry Payne Coombs, operating as King and Coombs. The partnership was dissolved in February, 1853. King exhibited two models of achromatic microscopes and a photographic chamber at the 1855 Paris International Exhibition. Some years later, Husbands and Clarke took over the T.D. King’s business, probably in 1858, when he emigrated to Canada.

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